Choose the right addiction program for you…These are your options:

Moms choose their kids over absolutely everything and everyone

Most common treatment options for addiction:
Research studies on addiction treatment typically have classified programs into several general types or modalities. Treatment approaches and individual programs continue to evolve and diversify, and many programs today do not fit neatly into traditional drug addiction treatment classifications.
Most, however, start with detoxification and medically managed withdrawal, often considered the first stage of treatment. Detoxification, the process by which the body clears itself of drugs, is designed to manage the acute and potentially dangerous physiological effects of stopping drug use. As stated previously, detoxification alone does not address the psychological, social, and behavioral problems associated with addiction and therefore does not typically produce lasting behavioral changes necessary for recovery. Detoxification should thus be followed by a formal assessment and referral to drug addiction treatment.
Because it is often accompanied by unpleasant and potentially fatal side effects stemming from withdrawal, detoxification is often managed with medications administered by a physician in an inpatient or outpatient setting; therefore, it is referred to as “medically managed withdrawal.” Medications are available to assist in the withdrawal from opioids, benzodiazepines, alcohol, nicotine, barbiturates, and other sedatives.

Most common treatment programs for addiction

  1. Long-Term Residential Treatment
    Long-term residential treatment provides care 24 hours a day, generally in non-hospital settings. The best-known residential treatment model is the therapeutic community (TC), with planned lengths of stay of between 6 and 12 months. TCs focus on the “resocialization” of the individual and use the program’s entire community—including other residents, staff, and the social context—as active components of treatment. Addiction is viewed in the context of an individual’s social and psychological deficits, and treatment focuses on developing personal accountability and responsibility as well as socially productive lives. Treatment is highly structured and can be confrontational at times, with activities designed to help residents examine damaging beliefs, self-concepts, and destructive patterns of behavior and adopt new, more harmonious and constructive ways to interact with others. Many TCs offer comprehensive services, which can include employment training and other support services, onsite. Research shows that TCs can be modified to treat individuals with special needs, including adolescents, women, homeless individuals, people with severe mental disorders, and individuals in the criminal justice system.
  2. Short-Term Residential Treatment
    Short-term residential programs provide intensive but relatively brief treatment based on a modified 12-step approach. These programs were originally designed to treat alcohol problems, but during the cocaine epidemic of the mid-1980s, many began to treat other types of substance use disorders. The original residential treatment model consisted of a 3- to 6-week hospital-based inpatient treatment phase followed by extended outpatient therapy and participation in a self-help group, such as AA. Following stays in residential treatment programs, it is important for individuals to remain engaged in outpatient treatment programs and/or aftercare programs. These programs help to reduce the risk of relapse once a patient leaves the residential setting.
  3. Outpatient Treatment Programs
    Outpatient treatment varies in the types and intensity of services offered. Such treatment costs less than residential or inpatient treatment and often is more suitable for people with jobs or extensive social supports. It should be noted, however, that low-intensity programs may offer little more than drug education. Other outpatient models, such as intensive day treatment, can be comparable to residential programs in services and effectiveness, depending on the individual patient’s characteristics and needs. In many outpatient programs, group counseling can be a major component. Some outpatient programs are also designed to treat patients with medical or other mental health problems in addition to their drug disorder.
  4. Individualized Drug Counseling
    Individualized drug counseling not only focuses on reducing or stopping illicit drug or alcohol use; it also addresses related areas of impaired functioning—such as employment stater., illegal activity, and family/social relations—as well as the content and structure of the patient’s recovery program. Through its emphasis on short-term behavioral goals, individualized counseling helps the patient develop coping strategies and tools to abstain from drug use and maintain abstinence. The addiction counselor encourages 12-step participation (at least one or two times per week) and makes referrals for needed supplemental medical, psychiatric, employment, and other services.
  5. Group Counseling
    Many therapeutic settings use group therapy to capitalize on the social reinforcement offered by peer discussion and to help promote drug-free lifestyles. Research has shown that when group therapy either is offered in conjunction with individualized drug counseling or is formatted to reflect the principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy or contingency management, positive outcomes are achieved. Currently, researchers are testing conditions in which group therapy can be standardized and made more community-friendly.

I’m adding on a treatment ad on option to these programs:

Peer Counseling for Addiction

This means, counseling from an individual that has real life experience with addiction, and recovery. Someone who has been where you are, knows what you are experiencing, and even what is going through your thoughts. A person with years in recovery under their belt, has experienced relapses, and knows how to help you because they have been there and have reached a point in recovery in which you desire to achieve and can help you achieve that. 

As an addict in recovery, I can tell you that everyone is different and each person’s addiction is different, so what works for you may not work for someone else. In any case, addiction absolutely doesn’t work, that program is failing you and I think you know that. It’s only a matter of time before you either end up in jail, homeless and broke, or worse dead. Please don’t wait because the longer you do the harder it will be to not only quit but to heal your body physically and then longer mentally. You can do it, I’m not saying there’s a cure, I don’t lie, but I am saying this is a manageable life long disease that you can master. Don’t put it off any longer if at all possible, and remember your not alone, and that even the best succumb to this so don’t feel embarrassed or ashamed of yourself. Your a fighter and I’ll see you on the flipside. Please send me a message if anyone needs advice or has questions, Ill be happy to help you if I can and if I can’t I’ll find you someone who can and will.

Thanks to all my readers,

AmyB.

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How to Create the Best Addiction Toolbox

Asks’s Madmom05: Visit my Facebook pg please and join me in my recovery and help support my mission to lead others to recovery, stop addiction before it starts through education, and getting the truth out there. I need my countries support here, please? I can’t do it alone, just like I couldn’t do recovery alone. Help me, help others and join my cause!

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM A TOOLBOX?

Whether you are thinking about sobriety, are in the early stages of it, or are well into it, you can benefit from having a Toolbox. Actually, if you are human you can benefit from a Toolbox.

If you are still drinking/drugging/whatevering, you can start incorporating these things NOW. By doing this, you effectively soften the blow when you remove the harmful substance. Adding in healthy coping tools before the quit creates new habits, new synapses in the brain, new circuitry. You effectively train yourself to seek the healthy coping mechanism/tool, and as you move through quitting the bad stuff, your body has learned other ways to self-soothe/balance/cope.

#Madmom05realRecovery-A personal note:
The most used “Tool” that I have in my own Addiction Recovery Toolbox, is for times of acute and sudden stress, days in which im feeling particularly depressed or am so close to giving in, actually can be accessed through anyone’s YouTube app! I made a #motivationinRecovery playlist and added all my favorite speeches or talks, or songs that motivate me to keep going and to not give up. I listen to them and slowly but surely my thinking eventually begins to change and I get that boost of confidence I need to realize that not only was I triggered, but I can name what triggered me, note any red flag thoughts or actions that I had prior to that and begin to plan ways to better avoid that in the future, even potentially training myself to catch the red flags, and then immediately redirect myself towards something that effectively holds my attention and mind away from the problem/problems that lead me to thinking about giving up my sobriety. I’m not near there as of yet, but with practice I know I can be my own defense and win in the long as long as I prepare for absolutely anything that could cause me to fail.

#Recoveryrising. #SoberNation

Thank you to all my followers, readers, supporters, friends and family,

Madmom05

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Drug Route through body..

Drug Administration and Distribution

Drugs can enter the body a variety of ways. The easiest way to get a drug into the bloodstream is to inject it directly into a vein. If a drug is ingested by mouth, smoked, or snorted, it must pass several barriers before reaching the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, the drugs can be distributed throughout the body.

The route that drugs take follows the circulatory path of the blood. The first pass throughout the body depends on the actual route of administration. Drugs that are smoked go directly with the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart. Then they leave the heart through the aorta, the major artery, to travel to the rest of the body. If drugs are injected or snorted, they enter the venous system and get returned to the heart with de-oxygenated blood, before traveling to the lungs and then back to the heart. If a drug is ingested orally, it diffuses into capillaries in the stomach and small intestine that connect to blood vessels that go directly to the liver. So as drugs leave the gut they travel to the liver first (this is called the portal circulation). In the liver, some of the drug is metabolized as it passes through (see discussion of metabolism below).

After the drug leaves the liver, it travels through the venous system to the heart, then to the lungs and finally back to the heart to be distributed throughout the rest of the body via the arterial system. The circulatory system is a very efficient way to distribute drugs throughout the body. As described above, drugs leave the heart by way of the aorta. This main artery branches into large arteries as they travel to various organs. As arteries enter organs, they branch into arterioles, which branch into even smaller units, the capillaries. Capillaries are the smallest form of blood vessels and are very numerous. In fact they are able to deliver nutrients such as oxygen and glucose to every cell in the body. [They also pick up waste such as carbon dioxide and metabolic products.]